Bills We're Tracking

Below is a list of all the bills we're tracking. For a sortable list, visit our AirTable here.

Oversight Of Chemicals Used In Oil & Gas

HB22-1348

The bill establishes a regulatory scheme that requires disclosure of certain chemical information for products used in downhole oil and gas operations (chemical disclosure information). On or before July 31, 2023, the oil and gas conservation commission (commission) is required to utilize or develop a chemical disclosure website to collect and share certain chemical disclosure information to the public (chemical disclosure

website).

On and after July 31, 2023, a manufacturer that sells or distributes a chemical product for use in underground oil and gas operations (downhole operations) in the state must disclose to the commission:
- The trade name of the chemical product;
- A list of the names of each chemical used in the chemical product;
- The estimated amount of each chemical used in the chemical product; and
- A description of the intended purpose of the chemical used in the chemical product.

The manufacturer must also provide the commission with a declaration that the chemical product contains no intentionally added perfluoroalkyl or polyfluoroalkyl chemicals.

For manufacturers that were already selling or distributing a chemical product for use in downhole operations in the state before July 31, 2023, the disclosure and declaration must be made at least 30 days before July 31, 2023. For manufacturers that begin to sell or distribute a chemical product for use in downhole operations in the state on or after July 31, 2023, the disclosure and declaration must be made at least 30 days before the manufacturer begins selling or distributing the chemical product.

On and after July 31, 2023, an operator of downhole operations using a chemical product must disclose to the commission:
- The date of commencement of downhole operations;
- The county of the well site where downhole operations are being conducted;
- The numerical identifier assigned by the American Petroleum Institute to the well where downhole operations are being conducted; and
- The trade names and quantities of any chemical products the operator plans to use in downhole operations.

The operator must also provide the commission with a declaration that the chemical product contains no intentionally added perfluoroalkyl or polyfluoroalkyl chemicals.

For downhole operations that commenced before July 31, 2023, and that will be ongoing on July 31, 2023, the disclosure and declaration must be made at least 75 days before July 31, 2023. For downhole operations that commence on or after July 31, 2023, the disclosure and declaration must be made at least 75 days before commencement of downhole operations.

The commission will use the chemical disclosure information to create a chemical disclosure list for each well site, which will include:
- An alphabetical list of names of chemicals that will be used in downhole operations at the well site; and
- The total estimated amount of each chemical that will be used at the well site.

The commission will post each chemical disclosure list on the chemical disclosure website. The commission shall provide the chemical disclosure list to the applicable operator within 7 days after the operator's disclosures.

Prior to the commencement of downhole operations, the operator is required to disclose the chemical disclosure list to communities near where downhole operations will be conducted, local public water administrators, and, if there is a high-priority habitat near where downhole operations are being conducted, the division of parks and wildlife. For downhole operations that commenced before July 31, 2023, and that will be ongoing on July 31, 2023, the disclosure of the chemical disclosure list by the operator to these entities must be made at least 60 days before July 31, 2023. For downhole operations that commence on or after July 31, 2023, the disclosure of the chemical disclosure list by the operator to these entities must be made at least 60 days before commencement of downhole operations.

If a manufacturer believes that any information that will be included on a chemical disclosure list is a trade secret, the manufacturer must file a trade secret claim with the commission. If the commission determines that the information covered by the trade secret claim constitutes a trade secret, the commission shall not include the information in any applicable chemical disclosure list.

On or before July 31, 2023, the commission must promulgate rules that set standards for the disclosure of the chemical disclosure information to:
- An officer or employee of the United States, the state, or a local government in connection with the officer's or employee's official duties;
- Contractors of the United States, the state, or a local government if the commission determines that the disclosure is necessary for performance of a contract or the protection of public health and safety;
- A health-care professional in connection with an emergency or with diagnosing or treating a patient; and
- In order to protect public safety, a person who is employed in public health or a scientist or researcher employed by an institution of higher education.

No later than February 1, 2025, and no later than February 1 each year thereafter, the commission shall submit and present an annual report to the general assembly based on the chemical disclosure information.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 2nd Reading

4/26/2022

9:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Temporarily Reduce Road User Charges

HB22-1351

Senate Bill 21-260:
- Created phased-in road usage fees on gasoline and diesel that increase from 2 cents per gallon for state fiscal year (FY) 2022-23, when they are first imposed, to 8 cents per gallon for FYs 2028-29 through 2031-32, and thereafter continue to increase to account for inflation; and
- Temporarily reduced the amount of the road safety surcharge, which is imposed annually when a motor vehicle is registered by $11.10 for registration periods beginning in 2022 and $5.55 for registration periods beginning in 2023.

The bill delays the initial imposition of the road usage fees from July 1, 2022, to January 1, 2023, and increases the amount of the reduction in the road safety surcharge for registration periods beginning in 2023 from $5.55 to $11.10. The bill also requires transfers to be made from the general fund to the state highway fund and the highway users tax fund to hold the department of transportation, counties, and municipalities harmless from the reductions in road usage fee and road safety surcharge revenue.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Protecting Injured Workers' Mental Health Records

HB22-1354

The bill clarifies provisions in the "Workers' Compensation Act of Colorado" (act) relating to the release and disclosure of mental health records pertaining to an injured employee making a claim under the act (claimant).

The bill:
- Defines "mental health records" as psychological or psychiatric intake evaluation or progress notes or psychiatric independent medical examination and division independent medical examination records pertaining to a claimant;
- Requires a mental health provider to provide an insurer with mental health records, as necessary for payment, adjustment, and adjudication of claims involving psychiatric issues;
- Prohibits the disclosure of mental health records to any person who is not directly involved in adjusting or adjudicating claims involving psychiatric issues without the consent of the mental health provider or claimant;
- Prohibits an insurer from releasing a claimant's mental health records to the claimant's employer;
- Limits an insurer's disclosure of a claimant's mental health records to an employer, supervisor, or manager to only information from the mental health records pertaining to work restrictions placed on the claimant; and
- For a self-insured employer:
- Requires the employer to keep a claimant's mental health records separate from personnel files;
- Limits disclosure of the claimant's mental health records to a supervisor or manager to only information from the mental health records pertaining to work restrictions placed on the claimant; and
- Prohibits disclosure of the claimant's mental health records to any third party and redisclosure by the third party to any person who is not directly involved in adjusting or adjudicating claims involving psychiatric issues without the consent of the treating mental health provider or claimant.

The bill requires the director of the division of workers' compensation in the department of labor and employment (division) to:
- Institute a training program relating to mental health records for division employees responsible for medical policy and claims management and processing; and
- Promulgate rules necessary for the implementation of the bill.

The bill requires a person providing mental health services under the act to be a licensed mental health provider in the state.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Producer Responsibility Program For Recycling

HB22-1355

On or before June 1, 2023, the executive director (executive director) of the Colorado department of public health and environment (department) must designate a nonprofit organization (organization) to implement and manage a statewide program (program) that provides recycling services to covered entities in the state, which are defined as residences, businesses, schools, government buildings, and public places. The program is funded by annual dues (producer responsibility dues) paid by producers of products that use covered materials (producers). Covered materials are defined as packaging materials and paper products that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state.
The bill creates the producer responsibility program for statewide recycling advisory board (advisory board) that consists of members who have expertise in recycling programs and are knowledgeable about recycling services in the different geographic regions of the state.

Prior to the implementation of the program, the organization must:
- On or before September 1, 2023, hire an independent third party to conduct an assessment of the recycling services currently provided in the state and the recycling needs in the state that are not being met (needs assessment);
- On or before April 1, 2024, report the results of the needs assessment to the advisory board and the executive director; and
- On or before February 1, 2025, after soliciting input from the advisory board and other key stakeholders, submit a plan proposal for the program (plan proposal) to the advisory board and executive director.

The plan proposal will initially cover recycling services only for residential covered entities. The plan proposal must:
- Describe how the organization will meet certain convenience standards and statewide recycling, collection, and postconsumer-recycled-content rates (rates);
- Establish a funding mechanism through the collection of producer responsibility dues that covers the organization's costs in implementing the program and the costs of the department in overseeing the program;
- Establish an objective formula to reimburse 100% of the net recycling services costs of public and private recycling service providers (providers) performing services under the program;
- Provide a list of covered materials (minimum recyclable list) that providers performing services under the program must collect to be eligible for reimbursement under the program;
- Set minimum rate targets that the state will strive to meet by January 1, 2030, and January 1, 2035, and describe how the state can meet increased rates after 2035; and
- Describe a process and timeline, beginning no later than 2028, to expand recycling services to applicable nonresidential covered entities.

As part of the program, the organization must:
- Utilize and expand on providers' existing recycling services to provide statewide recycling services at no charge to covered entities for all covered materials on the minimum recyclable list;
- Develop and implement a statewide education and outreach program on the recycling and reuse of covered materials;
- Contract with an independent third party to conduct an annual audit of the program; and
- Submit an annual report to the advisory board and the executive director describing the progress of the program (annual report).

Effective July 1, 2025, a producer may not sell or distribute any products that use covered materials in the state unless the producer is participating in the program or, after January 1, 2029, as set forth in an additional producer responsibility program that has been approved by the executive director.

The advisory board has the following duties:
- Advise the organization on the needs assessment;
- Review the needs assessment;
- Review the plan proposal and make recommendations to the executive director regarding its approval or rejection;
- Review any necessary amendments to the program, make recommendations on the amendments to the organization, and then make recommendations to the executive director regarding approval or rejection of the amendments;
- Review the annual report submitted by the organization; and
- Consult with the organization on the development and updating of the minimum recyclable list.

The bill establishes an administrative penalty for the organization's or a producer's violation of the relevant statutes and rules. The collected penalties are deposited into the recycling resources economic opportunity fund.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Clean Water In Schools And Child Care Centers

HB22-1358

The bill requires each public K-12 school (school), child care center, and family child care home to ensure that a filter is installed on every drinking water source and that each water filter complies with national standards and is replaced at least as frequently as required by the manufacturer's instructions. The bill also requires:
- Each school and child care center to develop and implement a plan for the maintenance of its water filters and filtration systems, which plan includes the creation of an inventory of water sources, regular testing of drinking water, and remediation efforts;
- Family child care homes to regularly test drinking water and take certain remediation efforts; and
- The department of public health and environment (department) to provide training to each school, child care center, and family child care home regarding water filter maintenance, flushing protocols, testing for lead, reporting processes for sampling reports, and other activities relevant to compliance with the bill's new requirements.

The bill creates the school and child care clean drinking water fund in the department and requires the department to expend money from the fund only to help schools, child care centers, and family child care homes pay for the costs of complying with the bill's new requirements.

The water quality control commission (commission) may enforce the new provisions by issuing administrative orders and assessing penalties but is not required to do so. On or before each December 1, starting in 2023, the commission is required to submit a report to legislative committees of reference with jurisdiction over public health matters, which report summarizes the results of the tests performed by schools, child care centers, and family child care homes and identifies noncompliant schools, child care centers, and family child care homes.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

4/25/2022

9:30 AM

Old State Library

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Health Needs Of Persons In Criminal Justice System

SB22-196

The bill establishes the early intervention, deflection, and redirection from the criminal justice system grant program (grant program) in the behavioral health administration (BHA) to provide grants to local governments, federally recognized Indian tribes, health-care providers, community-based organizations, and nonprofit organizations to fund programs and strategies that prevent people with behavioral health needs from becoming involved with the criminal justice system or that redirect individuals in the criminal justice system with behavioral health needs from the system to appropriate services. Local law enforcement agencies are eligible for a grant only for the purpose of developing or expanding a co-responder community response program.
The BHA administers the grant program in consultation with the department of public safety. Each grant recipient must report to the BHA information about the use of the grant. The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate $51.5 million from the behavioral and mental health cash fund to the department of human services for the grant program.

The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate $3 million from the behavioral and mental health cash fund to the department of corrections (department) to provide medication-assisted treatment to individuals who are placed in the custody of the department. The department shall use the money for upgrades necessary to store medications at department facilities, for providing continuity of care for inmates with opioid use disorder between institutional settings and community-based treatment, and for facilitating long-term treatment and recovery of individuals upon release.

The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate $4 million from the behavioral and mental health cash fund to the judicial department for allocation to district attorneys for pretrial diversion programs.

The bill creates the behavioral health information and data sharing program to award grants to counties to integrate the county jails' data systems with the Colorado integrated criminal justice information system. The division of criminal justice (division) within the department of public safety administers the program. The division is required to enter into an agreement with a third-party vendor to oversee the implementation of any data-sharing systems or software necessary for the program. The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate $3.5 million from the behavioral and mental health cash fund for the program.

The bill requires the state department of health care policy and financing (HCPF) to evaluate and determine whether the state should seek additional federal authority to provide screening, brief intervention, and care coordination services through the medical assistance program to persons immediately prior to release from jail or a department of corrections facility and to improve processes for determining and redetermining individuals for medical assistance eligibility. If HCPF determines that the state should request federal authority, HCPF must make the request. If HCPF determines that the state should not request federal authority, HCPF must submit a report to the joint budget committee of the general assembly that includes an alternate plan to ensure continuity of care for individuals being released from jail or prison.

The bill requires HCPF to determine whether federal authority is necessary to provide benefit coverage under the medical assistance program to people who are on work release from jail.

The bill requires each county jail to report quarterly about the number of inmates whose medicaid is suspended while incarcerated and the number of incarcerated inmates who are enrolled in, or whose medicaid is reinstated, prior to release. The bill requires a county jail to provide medicaid enrollment or re-enrollment paperwork to a person who is incarcerated in the jail and is eligible for medicaid benefits when the person enters the county jail.

The bill requires an administrator of a community corrections program to partner with a county department of human or social services to facilitate enrolling each offender participating in the program into medicaid.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Orphaned Oil And Gas Wells Enterprise

SB22-198

The bill creates the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise (enterprise) in the department of natural resources for the purpose of:
- Plugging, reclaiming, and remediating orphaned wells located in the state for which no owner or operator can be found or for which the owner or operator is unwilling or unable to pay the costs of plugging and abandoning the well;
- Ensuring that the costs associated with the plugging, reclaiming, and remediating of orphaned wells are borne by operators in the form of mitigation fees;
- Determining the amounts of mitigation fees; and
- Imposing and collecting mitigation fees.

On or before August 1, 2022; on or before April 30, 2023; and on or before April 30 each year thereafter, each operator shall pay a mitigation fee to the enterprise for each well that has been spud but is not yet plugged and abandoned, in accordance with rules promulgated by the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission (commission), in the following amounts:
- For operators with production that is equal to or less than a threshold to be determined by rules of the commission, $125 for each well; or
- For operators with production that exceeds a threshold to be determined by rules of the commission, $225 for each well.

Money collected as mitigation fees is credited to the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise cash fund (fund), which is created in the bill.

The bill also creates the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise board (enterprise board) and requires the enterprise board to administer the enterprise and, at least annually, to:
- Consider whether the mitigation fee amounts should be increased or reduced, based on current circumstances and reasonably anticipated future expenditures from the fund;
- If the enterprise board determines that an increase or reduction of the mitigation fee amounts is warranted, adjust the mitigation fee amounts; and
- Advise the commission of the outcome of the enterprise board's deliberations.

The commission may promulgate rules as necessary to implement the enterprise.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

4/26/2022

8:15 AM

LSB B

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Native Pollinating Insects Protection Study

SB22-199

The bill requires the executive director of the department of natural resources or the executive director's designee (executive director) to conduct a study as soon as practicable regarding the challenges associated with native pollinating insect decline, their associated ecosystems, and their health and resilience in the state. Based on the results of the study, the executive director is required to make recommendations:
- For the protection of native pollinating insects;
- On best practices for state agencies in implementing policies and practices regarding native pollinating insects; and
- On how to develop education and outreach programming. On or before January 1, 2024, the executive director shall submit to the general assembly and the governor a report summarizing the study and the executive director's recommendations based on the study.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Senate Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Rural Provider Stimulus Grant Program

SB22-200

The bill establishes the rural provider access and affordability stimulus grant program (grant program) in the Colorado department of health care policy and financing (state department). As part of the grant program, the state department may award grants for projects that modernize the affordability solutions and the information technology of health-care providers in rural communities (rural providers) and projects that expand access to health care in rural communities. The types of rural providers eligible for grants under the grant program are rural hospitals that have a lower net patient revenue or fund balance than other rural hospitals in the state, as determined by the medical services board (state board) by rule.
On or before December 31, 2022:
- The state department must adopt guidelines for the grant program (guidelines); and
- The state board must adopt rules as necessary for the administration of the grant program (rules).
The bill creates the rural provider access and affordability advisory committee (advisory committee) in the state department. The advisory committee is required to advise the state department on the administration of the grant program, the adoption of the guidelines, and the selection of grant recipients. The advisory committee is also required to advise on the rules.
The bill also creates the rural provider access and affordability fund (fund) in the state treasury. The bill requires the state treasurer to transfer $10,000,000 from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the fund for awarding grants under the grant program and the administration of the grant program.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted.)

Upcoming:

Senate Health & Human Services

4/25/2022

1:30 PM

SCR 357

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Oil And Gas Reporting

HB22-1361

The bill requires:
- No later than January 1, 2023, the oil and gas conservation commission (commission) to promulgate rules to require an oil and gas operator to conduct meter certification and calibration on an annual basis and submit an annual report to the commission that describes the results of that meter certification and calibration;
- No later than February 1, 2025, the state auditor to select a random sample of operators (random sample) and provide the list of operators in the random sample to the commission, the executive director of the department of revenue (executive director), and the division of administration in the department of public health and environment (division);
- No later than April 15, 2025, the commission, executive director, and division to submit certain reporting information for the operators in the random sample for calendar year 2023 and other information to the state auditor;
- No later than May 1, 2025, the state auditor to commence conducting or cause to be conducted a performance audit based on the information submitted by the commission, the executive director, and the division; and
- No later than March 1, 2026, the state auditor to prepare a report and recommendations based on the performance audit, which the state auditor will present to the legislative audit committee.

The bill also establishes a maximum penalty of $1,000 per day per violation for oil and gas operators in relation to violations related to the filing of air pollution emission notices with the division.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

4/25/2022

9:30 AM

Old State Library

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Commission On Judicial Discipline

SB22-201

A commission on judicial discipline (commission) is established in current law pursuant to section 23 (3) of article VI of the state constitution. The bill implements the commission by:
- Specifying the duties of the commission;
- Establishing and specifying the duties of an office of judicial discipline (office) as an independent office within the judicial department;
- Authorizing the commission to appoint an executive director of the office and specifying the duties of the executive director;
- Authorizing the commission to appoint and determine the duties of special counsel, which may include representing the people in formal proceedings;
- Establishing immunity for commissioners;
- Specifying when information should be shared among offices within the judicial department responsible for reviewing actions of current and potential judges and justices;
- Specifying duties of personnel within the judicial department when they become aware of potential issues of judicial discipline; and
- Establishing a special cash fund and specifying sources of money for the fund and uses of the money in the fund.

For rules, guidelines, and procedures relating to judicial discipline adopted by the supreme court, the bill requires the supreme court to:
- Provide the commission with notice and an opportunity to object and, if the commission objects, to engage with the commission in good-faith efforts to resolve differences; and
- Post notice of each rule, guideline, or procedure and allow for public comment, including an opportunity for the public to address the supreme court.

The bill creates the legislative interim committee on judicial discipline to study Colorado's system of judicial discipline and make recommendations for necessary changes to that system.

The bill clarifies that the disclosure of materials and information to the state auditor pursuant to an investigation based on an allegation of fraud by an employee or contracted individual does not cause the materials and information to lose their status as privileged or confidential based solely upon such disclosure.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Senate Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

State Match For Mill Levy Override Revenue

SB22-202

Beginning in the 2022-23 budget year, the bill directs the department of education (department) to annually distribute to each eligible school district and each eligible institute charter school an amount of state money as a matching amount to the property tax revenue the eligible district receives from mills levied for additional revenue (override mills). To determine the amount, if any, of state matching money, the department must calculate for each district:
- The district's maximum number of override mills; and
- The number of override mills the district may be expected to levy toward the district's maximum number of override mills (override mill capacity), based on the district's median household income.

If a district's override mill capacity is less than the maximum number of override mills, the district is eligible to receive matching state money. The department must calculate each eligible district's mill levy match amount as provided in the bill. An institute charter school that is located within an eligible district is eligible to receive a distribution of state money equal to the eligible district's per pupil mill levy match amount multiplied by the institute charter school's pupil enrollment. The department must calculate and distribute in June of each budget year the mill levy match amounts from the mill levy override match fund created in the bill.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

4/26/2022

8:15 AM

LSB B

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Program Of All-inclusive Care For The Elderly

SB22-203

No later than June 30, 2023, the bill requires the department of health care policy and financing (state department), in conjunction with the department of public health and environment, to develop a regulatory plan to establish formal oversight requirements for the program of all-inclusive care for the elderly (PACE).
No later than March 1, 2024, the bill requires the state department to establish, administer, and enforce minimum regulatory standards and rules for the PACE program.

The bill requires the state department to continually analyze the reimbursement methodology for PACE entities and provide an update to specified committees of the general assembly of any methodology requirements that incorporate encounter data and any associated costs to the state department in overseeing PACE entities.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)
Read Less

Upcoming:

House Health & Insurance

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Repeal Federal Government Confirm Status For Identification Documents

SB22-204

Under existing law, the department of revenue (department) is required to issue a driver's license, instruction permit, or identification card (identification documents) to a person who is lawfully present in the United States if:
- The individual qualifies for the identification document;
- The individual produces documents that satisfy the department that the individual is lawfully present; and
- The federal government confirms the individual's status, including electronically through the federal systematic alien verification for entitlements (SAVE) system.

The bill repeals the requirement that the federal government confirm the individual's status.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

4/26/2022

8:15 AM

LSB B

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Intoxicating Hemp And Tetrahydrocannabinol Products

SB22-205

Section 2 of the bill prohibits:
- The manufacture, sale, offering for sale, storage, or delivery of an adult use cannabis product that is not manufactured by a person licensed under the "Colorado Marijuana Code" (license holder);
- The manufacture, sale, offering for sale, storage, or delivery of a product containing industrial hemp that is for human consumption and that is not food, a cosmetic, a dietary supplement, a food additive, an herb, or an over-the-counter drug that contains industrial hemp; and
- The manufacture, sale, offering for sale, storage, or delivery of an industrial hemp product that was not manufactured by a registered wholesale food manufacturer.
Section 3 imposes a civil penalty of up to $10,000 for:
- Manufacturing, selling, offering for sale, storing, or delivering an adult use cannabis product that is not manufactured by a license holder; and
- Violating a permit requirement for industrial hemp products established by rule.
These penalties are credited to the the wholesale food manufacturing and storage protection cash fund.
Section 4 prohibits a political subdivision of Colorado from promulgating or enforcing additional duties for or standards for food safety applicable to premises or places where industrial hemp products are held for distribution, produced, manufactured, packed, processed, prepared, treated, packaged, or transported.
Current law authorizes the department of public health and environment (department) to require permits for manufacturing food that may be contaminated so that it is injurious to health. The department may establish standards for the permits and manufacturing. Section 5 :
- Adds dietary supplements, food additives, cosmetics, and industrial hemp products to this provision;
- Adds that an ingredient that is injurious to health also authorizes the department to require a permit.
Section 6 requires a political subdivision of Colorado to get department approval to perform food safety inspections at facilities used to store, manufacture, produce, pack, process, treat, package, or transport industrial hemp products.
Current law declares industrial hemp products not adulterated unless the product violates certain provisions. Section 7 adds that an industrial hemp product is deemed adulterated if the product is an adult use cannabis product and is not manufactured by a license holder. Section 7 authorizes a wholesale food manufacturing facility to sell, produce, or possess products containing artificially derived cannabinoids only if:
- The facility is registered;
- The product is an industrial hemp product;
- The product is not intoxicating; and
- Prior to distribution and sale, the manufacturing facility has provided the marijuana enforcement division (division) samples and information concerning the product.
Section 9 authorizes the division to promulgate rules, with the technical assistance of the department, to define the amount of one or more tetrahydrocannabinols that results in the designation of a product as an adult use cannabis product. Section 9 also requires the division to promulgate rules to regulate the manufacturing, distribution, and sale of adult use cannabis products as retail marijuana products. Section 10 prohibits a retail marijuana store from offering for sale or accepting an adult use cannabis product that was not properly designated as and transferred to it by a licensed retail marijuana products manufacturer or accelerator manufacturer. Section 11 prohibits a retail marijuana manufacturer from transferring an adult use cannabis product unless the person holds the appropriate license under the "Colorado Marijuana Code". Section 12 makes it a deceptive trade practice to violate the provisions of the bill that apply to hemp, cannabis, or anything made from hemp or cannabis.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Business, Labor, & Technology

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Disaster Preparedness And Recovery Resources

SB22-206

Section 2 creates the disaster resilience rebuilding program in the division of local government (division) in the department of local affairs. The disaster resilience rebuilding program's purpose is to provide loans and grants to homeowners, owners of residential rental property, businesses, governmental entities, and other organizations working to rebuild after a disaster emergency. The division may contract with a governmental entity, bank, credit union, community development financial institution (CDFI), or other entity to administer the disaster resilience rebuilding program. If the division contracts with an entity other than a governmental entity or CDFI, the division is required to engage in an open and competitive process to select the entity.
The division or an administrator is required to establish policies for administering the disaster resilience rebuilding program, including application requirements, eligibility requirements for applicants, maximum assistance levels, loan terms, and any specific criteria for the allowable uses of the loans and grants. Loans and grants may be used to:
- Subsidize costs to repair or rebuild a homeowner's primary residence that are insufficiently covered by the homeowner's insurance or by federal assistance programs, including costs to rebuild to advanced fire resistance standards and to replant climate ready trees and vegetation;
- Repair or reconstruct housing stock in areas that are experiencing a shortage of available housing by housing authorities and nonprofit organizations working to repair or reconstruct housing stock, or by owners of rental housing who agree to requirements to provide affordable rent;
- Rebuild neighborhoods planned to resist the impacts of natural disasters;
- Provide operating capital to a business experiencing a loss or interruption of business or to pay to repair or replace damaged business property and inventory; or
- Reimburse governmental entities for costs associated with a declared disaster that are not covered by available federal assistance, including costs associated with disaster management, fee waivers for building permits, infrastructure repairs, and replacement of lost revenue.

The bill creates the disaster resilience rebuilding program fund. The state treasurer is required to transfer $15 million to the fund after the effective date of the bill. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to the division for the rebuilding program.
Section 3 creates the sustainable rebuilding program in the Colorado energy office. The office is required to consult with the Colorado resiliency office and the department of local affairs in creating the sustainable rebuilding program. The sustainable rebuilding program's purpose is to provide loans and grants to homeowners, owners of residential rental property, and businesses that are rebuilding after a wildfire or other natural disaster to cover costs associated with building high performing, energy efficient, and resilient homes and structures. The office may contract with a governmental entity, Colorado-based nonprofit green bank with history and expertise in providing loans and grants for energy efficiency projects and services, business nonprofit, bank, credit union, or community development financial institution to administer the sustainable rebuilding program. If the office contracts with an entity other than a governmental entity, the office is required to engage in an open and competitive process to select the entity.
The Colorado energy office or an administrator is required to establish policies for administering the sustainable rebuilding program, including application requirements, eligibility requirements for homeowners and businesses, maximum assistance levels, loan terms, and any specific criteria for the allowable uses of the loans and grants.

The loans and grants may be used to:
- Install high-efficiency heat pumps for heating space or water;
- Achieve advanced energy certifications, including from Energy Star, the Passive House Institute U.S., the United States department of energy zero energy ready homes, or other similar programs;
- Achieve net zero energy or net zero carbon buildings with the addition of renewable energy generation;
- Assist with the costs of installing battery storage and electric vehicle charging stations;
- Cover the incremental costs of building to the most recent energy standard adopted by a local jurisdiction compared to the earlier version of the jurisdiction's energy code; and
- Support other similar uses identified by the office.

The bill creates the sustainable rebuilding program fund. The state treasurer is required to transfer $20 million to the fund after the effective date of the bill. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to the office for the resiliency program.
Section 4 creates the office of climate preparedness in the governor's office. The office is required to coordinate disaster recovery efforts for the governor's office as well as the development and implementation of the statewide climate preparedness roadmap (roadmap) that the office is also charged with preparing and publishing.
The office of climate preparedness may establish interagency and intergovernmental task forces and community advisory groups to inform and support the work of the office. The office may promote community engagement and information sharing and further efforts to implement the recommendations of the roadmap.

The office of climate preparedness is required to coordinate the implementation of the roadmap and may establish criteria for evaluating existing programs in all other state agencies to ensure implementation of the roadmap and its governing principles.

No later than December 1, 2023, the office of climate preparedness is required to prepare and publish and, every 3 years thereafter, update the roadmap. The roadmap must integrate and include information from all existing state plans that address climate mitigation, adaptation, resiliency, and recovery. The roadmap must build upon this previous body of work, seek to align existing plans, and identify any gaps in policy, planning, or resources. The roadmap must identify strategies for how the state will grow in population and continue to develop in a manner that meets certain goals specified in the bill.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

4/26/2022

2:00 PM

Old Supreme Court

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Improving Students' Postsecondary Options

HB22-1366

The bill establishes a number of new programs concerning postsecondary career and education options for students, including:
- Establishing the postsecondary, workforce, career, and education grant program in the department of education (CDE) to provide grants to local education providers to improve the training of school educators and administrators, to support students and families in developing career and education plans for after high school, and to increase the number of students for whom applications for free financial aid are completed;
- Creating regional postsecondary and workforce coordinators in the CDE to train educators concerning financial aspects of postsecondary options;
- Updating the financial literacy resource bank to include more information and training concerning postsecondary financial aid;
- Creating stipends for teachers who successfully complete financial aid training;
- Adding a requirement to individual career and postsecondary education plans to include information about available state and federal financial aid;
- Requiring the department of higher education (CDHE) to use technology to assist students and families in completing postsecondary state and federal financial aid applications; and
- Requiring the CDHE to make certain improvements to streamline the Colorado application for financial aid.

The bill appropriates money for each of the programs and specifies that the CDE and the CDHE may use the money appropriated in subsequent years without additional appropriation.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Updates To Employment Discrimination Laws

HB22-1367

The bill amends employment discrimination laws, commonly referred to as the "Colorado Anti-discrimination Act" or "CADA", as follows:
- Expands the definition of "employee" to include individuals in domestic service;
- Extends the time limit to file a charge with the Colorado civil rights commission from 6 months to 300 days after the alleged discriminatory or unfair employment practice occurred; and
- Repeals the prohibition, applicable in age discrimination cases only, against the relief and recovery of certain damages so that the remedies available in employment discrimination claims are consistent, regardless of the type of discrimination alleged.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Community Corrections Programs Access

HB22-1368

Under current law, certain community corrections program funding is not permitted to come from the general fund. The bill permits such community corrections program funding to come from the general fund.

The bill requires the Colorado commission on criminal and juvenile justice (commission) to establish a task force to examine and make findings and recommendations to the commission concerning improving access to community corrections programs for persons convicted of misdemeanors.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Coverage Requirements For Health-care Products

HB22-1370

Beginning in 2023, the bill requires each health insurance carrier (carrier) that offers an individual or small group health benefit plan in this state to offer at least 25% of its health benefit plans on the Colorado health benefit exchange (exchange) and at least 25% of its plans not on the exchange in each bronze, silver, gold, and platinum benefit level in each service area as copayment-only payment structures for all prescription drug cost tiers.
Starting in 2024, a carrier or, if a carrier uses a pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) for claims processing services or other prescription drug or device services under a health benefit plan offered by the carrier, the PBM, or a representative of the carrier or the PBM, is prohibited from modifying or applying a modification to the current prescription drug formulary during the current plan year.

The bill repeals and reenacts the current requirements for step therapy and requires a carrier to use clinical review criteria to establish the step-therapy protocol.

For each health benefit plan issued or renewed on or after January 1, 2024, the bill requires each carrier or PBM to demonstrate to the division of insurance that:
- 100% of the estimated rebates received or to be received in connection with dispensing or administering prescription drugs included in the carrier's prescription drug formulary are used to reduce costs for the employer or individual purchasing the plan;
- For small group and large employer health benefit plans, all rebates are used to reduce employer and individual employee costs; and
- For individual health benefit plans, all rebates are used to reduce consumers' premiums and out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs to the extent practicable.

The bill requires the commissioner of insurance (commissioner) to promulgate rules to implement prescription drug pass-through requirements for carriers. Each carrier or PBM is required to report annually specified prescription drug rebate information to the commissioner.

Beginning in 2023, the bill requires the department of health care policy and financing, in collaboration with the administrator of the all-payer claims database, to conduct an annual analysis of the prescription drug rebates received in the previous calendar year, by carrier and prescription drug tier, and make the analysis available to the public.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Health & Insurance

4/27/2022

1:30 PM

HCR 0112

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Remove Peace Officer Residency Requirement

HB22-1371

Current law requires a peace officer to be a bona fide Colorado resident. The bill removes that requirement.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Judiciary

Status:

Introduced in House,Passed House,Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Court-ordered Restitution Paid By Juveniles

HB22-1373

The bill prohibits a court from ordering a juvenile to pay restitution to insurance companies. A court may still order restitution for a victim's pecuniary loss for which the victim cannot be compensated under a policy of insurance, self-insurance, an indemnity agreement, or a risk management fund.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Child Residential Treatment And Runaway Youth

HB22-1375

The bill requires the state department of human services (state department) to develop and implement a quality assurance and accountability system (system) to set quality measures for certain residential child care facilities (residential treatment facilities). The system includes quality assurance standards and a collaborative model of quality improvement in which providers and oversight agencies work together to ensure that residential treatment facilities meet the quality assurance standards. The state department must enter into an agreement with an institution of higher education to collaborate and assist the state department with developing the system.
The state department shall implement the system statewide on or before July 1, 2026. Prior to implementing the system statewide, the state department shall convene an advisory group to advise the state department on the development of the system and convene an implementation team to run a pilot program of the system. The state department is required to annually report to the general assembly about the system.

The bill creates the Timothy Montoya task force to prevent children from running away from out-of-home placement (task force) in the office of the child protection ombudsman. The task force must analyze the root causes of why children run away from out-of-home placement; develop a consistent, prompt, and effective response to recover missing children; and address the safety and well-being of a child who has run away upon the child's return to out-of-home placement.

The office of the child protection ombudsman must enter into an agreement with an institution of higher education to perform research that supports the task force's work and conduct focus groups with children in out-of-home placement, young adults who have aged out of the child protection system, and out-of-home placement providers.

The task force is required to issue a preliminary report by October 1, 2023, and a final report by October 1, 2024, that each include the task force's findings and recommendations to reduce the number children who run away from out-of-home placement.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

HCR 0112

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Supportive Learning Environments For K-12 Students

HB22-1376

The bill requires the department of education (department) to compile data and create reports based on information received from school districts and charter schools (schools) related to chronic absenteeism rates, the number of in-school and out-of-school suspensions, the number of expulsions, the number of students handcuffed or restrained, the number of referrals to law enforcement, and the number of school-related arrests. The department shall annually update and post such data and reports on its website.
The department shall create easily accessible and user-friendly school district profiles relating to school climate, including school climate surveys.

Restrictions concerning the use of restraints on students are increased, including providing, creating, and implementing training for school staff and school security staff on the use of restraints and adding restrictions to the use of restraints on students.

The department is required to develop a policy for hiring, training, and evaluating school resource officers.

For the state fiscal year 2022-23, the bill requires an additional appropriation of $2 million to the department to continue the expelled and at-risk student services program for the purpose of providing services and supports to develop effective attendance and discipline systems, to address educational inequities and disproportionate discipline practices, and to offer staff training and technical assistance to ensure the culturally responsive implementation of services and supports.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Prevention Of Title IX Misconduct In Public Schools

SB22-207

To comply with federal law, the bill requires covered public schools to adopt a Title IX policy pursuant to Title IX of the federal "Education Amendments of 1972". The bill outlines the information that must be included in the Title IX policy, including definitions of forms of misconduct and the procedures for reporting and investigating misconduct under Title IX. The bill requires covered public schools to provide their Title IX policy to the department of education.
To comply with federal law, the bill requires covered public schools to designate at least one employee as the Title IX coordinator, who is responsible for coordinating the school's compliance with Title IX, including investigating or adjudicating complaints under the covered public school's Title IX policy.

The bill requires covered public schools to promote on their websites awareness and prevention of misconduct, the covered public school's Title IX policy, and the name and contact information of the Title IX coordinator. Covered public schools are required to annually distribute through electronic or other means of communication the covered public school's Title IX policy as part of the covered public school's handbook to parents with students enrolled in kindergarten through fifth grade and to students enrolled in sixth through twelfth grade.

The bill requires covered public schools to provide training for employees, parents, and students on the Title IX policy. The bill outlines the training requirements, which include how to promote awareness and prevention of misconduct, an explanation of the Title IX policy, and an explanation of relevant federal and state law that affect the Title IX policy.

The bill creates the rural school district Title IX implementation grant program (grant program). The purpose of the grant program is to award money to rural school districts to assist rural schools with creating, implementing, or updating Title IX policies and procedures to comply with federal and state law. The state board of education shall promulgate rules for the grant program.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Education

4/28/2022

1:30 PM

SCR 357

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Repurpose The Ridge View Campus

SB22-211

In 2001, the state began operating an academic model juvenile facility on the parcel of real property formerly known as the Lowry bombing range and currently referred to as the Ridge View campus. The juvenile facility, known as the Ridge View Youth Services Center, operated for 20 years at the Ridge View campus until the state closed the facility in 2021. The bill requires that the Ridge View campus be repurposed and converted into the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community to provide transitional housing, a continuum of behavioral health service treatment, medical care, vocational training, and skill development for its residents and the general public.
The department of human services (department) is required to transfer ownership of all or part of the Ridge View campus to the department of personnel for use by the division of housing (division) for the purposes of repurposing the Ridge View campus. The division, in collaboration with the behavioral health administration and the department of human services, is required to develop a feasible master plan for the redevelopment and operations of the Ridge View campus and is required to enter into one or more contracts with private contractors to establish the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community at the Ridge View campus.

The Ridge View Supportive Residential Community is required to provide the following services and programs:
- A transitional housing program for individual adults with case management, care coordination, and vocational and housing placement assistance;
- A continuum of behavioral health services and treatment, informed by American Society of Addiction Medicine standards, available to people coming from the transitional housing program and to the general public; and
- A federally qualified health clinic at which people have access to medical treatments that help facilitate recovery, including medical and dental care and a continuum of behavioral health services. The health clinic and all behavioral health services and treatment are required to be accessible to people receiving other treatment at the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community, people residing in the transitional housing, and the general public.

The bill specifies eligibility criteria for the programs and services that will be offered at the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community and specifies how individuals may be referred to the community.

For the 2022-23 state fiscal year, the bill requires the general assembly to appropriate money from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the division for the repurposing of the Ridge View campus and authorizes the division to use up to 10% of the amount appropriated for its administrative costs in connection with the repurposing of the Ridge View campus. The bill requires the division to comply with specified reporting requirements.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Health & Human Services

4/25/2022

1:30 PM

SCR 357

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Child Care Support Programs

SB22-213

The bill appropriates:
- $50 million from federal funds from child care development funds for the purposes of implementing the child care sustainability grant program;
- $19 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to emerging and expanding the child care grant program;
- $10 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to implement the employer-based child care facility grant program;
- $15 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to implement the early child care and education recruitment and retention grant and scholarship program. Of the $15 million, $2 million must be dedicated for home visiting workforce, early childhood mental health consultants, and early intervention providers, with $1.4 million of the $2 million dedicated for non-educator workforce scholarships and loan forgiveness, and $600,000 for developing consistent workforce pathways; and
- One million dollars to create and implement family-strengthening grant programs from the economic recovery and relief cash fund.

The bill creates the family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) support programs, which include an advisory group and a training program. The family, friend, and neighbor advisory group is created to advise the department on the needs of FFN providers and to make recommendations on changes to regulations, policies, funding, and procedures that would benefit the FFN community. The family, friend, and neighbor training program is created to allow community-based organizations and nonprofit organizations that have expertise working with FFN providers to provide them with information, training, and technical assistance to support best practices.

Subject to available appropriations, the department of early childhood shall make existing state programs available to the FFN community, including, but not limited to, home visitation, early intervention, early childhood mental health, workforce recruitment and retention, and family resource center services.

The bill appropriates $4.5 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to implement the FFN support programs.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Health & Human Services

4/25/2022

1:30 PM

SCR 357

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Infrastructure Investment And Jobs Act Cash Fund

SB22-215

Joint Budget Committee. The bill creates the "Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act" cash fund (fund) and requires the state treasurer to transfer $81.5 million to the fund. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to departments, subject to approval by the governor to be used as the nonfederal match funding necessary for the state or a local government to be eligible to receive federal approval and federal funds for certain categories of infrastructure projects allowed under the federal "Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act". The office of the governor (office) must establish a process for receiving, reviewing, and approving applications and awarding and distributing money from the fund and the office, as well as state departments receiving money from the fund, are subject to annual reporting requirements.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate 2nd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

Senate Chamber

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Minimum Age Of Motorboat Operators

SB22-221

Current law prohibits the operation of a motorboat by a person who is less than 16 years of age; except that, a person who is at least 14 years of age but less than 16 years of age may operate a motorboat if the person has completed a boating safety course approved by the division of parks and wildlife and possesses a boating safety certificate issued by the boating safety course provider.

The bill raises the minimum age requirement from 16 to 18 years of age and retains the existing exceptions for certain persons who are at least 14 years of age.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Protections For Donor-conceived Persons And Families

SB22-224

The bill creates the "Donor-conceived Persons and Families of Donor-conceived Persons Protection Act" (act). The act defines the following terms, among others:
- "Assisted reproduction" means a method of causing pregnancy other than sexual intercourse;
- "Gamete bank or fertility clinic" (gamete bank) means an IVF or fertility clinic, reproductive tissue bank, or oocyte or sperm donor matching agency that collects, processes, stores, sells, matches, distributes, provides, or releases gametes or embryos from a donor to a recipient parent or parents or the recipient's medical provider when the recipient and donor are unknown to each other, and that is located in Colorado or that is located inside or outside of Colorado and provides gametes or embryos to a recipient parent or parents in Colorado;
- "Donor-conceived person" (DCP) means a person of any age who was purposefully conceived through assisted reproduction; and
- "Recipient" or "recipient parent" means a person who receives donor gametes or embryos as an intended parent from a gamete bank for use in assisted reproduction for the purpose of conceiving a child.

The act requires:
- The board to prioritize the best interests of donor-conceived persons and families of donor-conceived persons;
- A donor to agree and consent in writing, prior to donation, to the release of identifying information and medical history (information) when any DCP conceived using the donor's gametes reaches 18 years of age;
- A gamete bank to take good-faith measures and keep adequate records to ensure that a donor's gametes are used to establish no more than a total of 10 families in or outside of Colorado;
- A gamete bank operating in Colorado or providing donor gametes for use in assisted reproduction in Colorado to obtain a license that is conditioned on compliance with the act and implementing rules;
- The board to establish a schedule of fees for licensure, with the department of public health and environment (department) collecting the appropriate fee at the time of application for licensure;
- The department to revoke licensure and issue fines for violations of the license, act, and implementing rules;
- Release of information to a DCP who is 18 years of age or older, or the DCP's legal parent or guardian;
- A gamete bank to securely maintain any records related to tissue donation and donor conception. The gamete bank shall also regularly request that a donor provide updates to the donor's contact information and medical history.
- A gamete bank to ensure that, prior to tissue donation or sale of tissue, each tissue donor and intended recipient receives written materials prepared by the department discussing various subjects related to DCPs and gamete donation.
The act creates the donor gamete bank and fertility clinic fund.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted.)

Upcoming:

Senate State, Veterans, & Military Affairs

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Programs To Support Health-care Workforce

SB22-226

The bill creates the health-care workforce resilience and retention program (program) using existing initiatives to ensure that Colorado's health-care workforce is adequately supported in order to meet the health-care demands of Coloradans and to support the resilience, well-being, and retention of health-care workers. The program is authorized to seek and expend gifts, grants, and donations to support the program. The program is exempt from the procurement code. The bill appropriates $2 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund for the program.
The bill creates the practice-based health education grant program (grant program) to increase practice-based training opportunities necessary for health profession students enrolled in accredited Colorado schools to complete degree requirements and become licensed to practice. The primary care office in the department of public health and environment administers the grant program and shall conduct a stakeholder engagement process to determine key operational components of the grant program policies and procedures. The bill appropriates $20 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund for the grant program.
The bill directs the state board of community colleges and occupational education (board) to administer the in-demand short-term health-care credentials program in order to support the expansion of available health-care professionals. The bill appropriates $26 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund for these programs. The board shall allocate funds to community colleges, area technical colleges, local district colleges, and community not-for-profit organizations that deliver hybrid programming that leverages place-based supports in partnership with online accredited university programs through reimbursement based on students enrolled in eligible programs for fiscal years 2022-23 to 2025-26 to:
- Provide assistance for tuition, fees, and course materials for eligible programs;
- Support alignment with existing efforts, such as apprenticeship and work-based learning, for students to earn eligible program credentials that lead into health-care careers such as nursing; and
- If unexpended resources exist or if the program use is less than anticipated, to expand eligible programs in allied health based on in-demand credential needs or include high school equivalency support and attainment for students without a high school degree who participate in the program.
The bill requires the primary care office and the governor's office of information technology to work through the government data advisory board to determine data-sharing agreements that integrate data collected by the state under existing authorities that may inform the analysis of need, allocation of resources, and evaluation of performance of state-administered or state-financed health workforce planning or development initiatives.
Under current law, a nurse who holds a volunteer nurse license cannot get paid for nursing tasks. The bill removes this limitation.
The bill directs the nurse-physician advisory task force for Colorado health care to make recommendations on:
- Alignment of health-care licensing with federal statutory minimums;
- Identification of unnecessary regulatory burdens or barriers;
- Regulatory reforms that support health-care licensees to work at their full scope of practice; and
- Feasibility of temporary candidate licenses for students nearing the completion of an accredited health-care program.
The bill makes the following changes and additions to the school nurse grant program:
- Repeals the requirement of a 5-year grant cycle;
- Requires that the grant supplement, not supplant, funding for school nurse positions existing in the local education provider's most recent fiscal year prior to applying for a grant;
- Directs the department of public health and environment to annually award grants; and
- Appropriates $3 million to the department of public health and environment for the grant program from the economic recovery and relief cash fund.
The bill appropriates $10 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the department of public health and environment. The department shall use this appropriation for recruitment and re-engagement efforts of workers in the health-care profession with current or expired licenses and staffing.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted.)

Upcoming:

Senate Health & Human Services

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Grant Program Providing Responses To Homelessness

HB22-1377

The bill creates the connecting Coloradans experiencing homelessness with services, treatment, and housing supports grant program (grant program), administered by the division of housing (division) in the department of local affairs (department).

The grant program provides grants to local governments and nonprofit organizations to enable those entities to make investments and improvements in their communities or regions of the state to address and respond to the needs of people experiencing homelessness.

The bill requires the division to develop policies, procedures, and guidelines governing the administration of the grant program. The bill specifies how grant funding is to be awarded and the eligible uses of grant money awarded under the grant program. The bill specifies requirements for grant recipients.

The bill creates the connecting Coloradans experiencing homelessness with services, treatment, and housing supports fund (fund) in the department. The bill specifies requirements pertaining to the administration of the fund. The bill requires a transfer of $105 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the fund to administer the grant program.

The bill sets forth specified reporting requirements pertaining to the grant program.

The bill requires the department, in conjunction with the department of health care policy and financing, to report to the house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services committee and the senate health and human services committee, and to its committee of reference during its "State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act" hearing, any results, recommendations, and federal implications concerning any supportive housing pilot program currently being administered by the department in conjunction with the department of health care policy and financing.

The bill requires the division to report on the activities of the grant program as part of the regular annual public report prepared by the division on affordable and emergency housing spending.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Transportation & Local Government

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

LSB A

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Denver-metro Regional Navigation Campus Grant

HB22-1378

The bill directs the division of housing in the department of local affairs (division) to award a grant to a local government in the Denver metropolitan area or a community partner in conjunction with a local government in order to build or acquire, and then facilitate, a regional navigation campus to respond to and prevent homelessness.

The bill requires the division, in collaboration with the department of human services and the behavioral health administration in the department of human services, to establish the application requirements, review applications, select a grant recipient, and ensure the grant is only awarded after a fair and rigorous open competition among eligible applicants.
The bill creates the regional navigation campus cash fund and requires the state treasurer to transfer $50 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the regional navigation campus cash fund on July 1, 2022.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Transportation & Local Government

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

LSB A

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Critical Services For Low-income Households

HB22-1380

The bill requires the department of human services to implement a work management system across all counties to interface with the Colorado benefits management system used to process and approve applications for essential state public assistance programs such as the supplemental nutrition assistance program (SNAP), medicaid, and Colorado works.
The bill integrates eligibility and enrollment for SNAP with eligibility criteria for the Colorado low-income energy assistance program to increase access.

The bill creates a community food access program (food program) in the department of agriculture (department). The purpose of the food program is to improve access to and lower prices for healthy foods in low-income and underserved areas of the state by supporting small grocery retailers. The small food business recovery and resilience grant program (grant program) is established, to be overseen by the food program. An advisory committee is established to assist the department with the grant program. One-time grants not to exceed $25,000 will be provided to small grocery retailers to help support infrastructure and other necessary items to make fresh, healthy food more accessible to low-income and underserved communities. The department is granted authority to promulgate rules as necessary to implement the food program.

The food program is repealed, effective September 1, 2027.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

HCR 0112

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Employment Opportunities For Juveniles

HB22-1383

The bill requires the general assembly to make an appropriation from the general fund to the department of human services (department). The department shall use the appropriation to fund career and technical education and vocational training programs in designated youth facilities for juveniles in the custody of the department.

The bill prevents an employer from requiring an applicant for employment of any age to disclose information related to an arrest, detention, processing, diversion, supervision, adjudication, or court disposition that occurred while the applicant was subject to the process and jurisdiction of the juvenile court. As a factor in determining any condition of employment, an employer shall not seek from any source any record related to an arrest, detention, processing, diversion, supervision, adjudication, or court disposition that occurred while the applicant was subject to the process and jurisdiction of the juvenile court, except for records that are publicly available and that are specifically related to the tasks or functions of the job. Records that are publicly available include juvenile offenses that constitute unlawful sexual behavior or a crime of violence. The bill does not apply to the screening of applicants who have direct contact with vulnerable persons.
The bill prohibits state or local agencies from denying or taking adverse action against an applicant who has been adjudicated for a delinquent act in a juvenile proceeding, but who is otherwise qualified for a license, certification, permit, or registration.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Judiciary

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

HCR 0107

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Competency To Proceed And Restoration To Competency

HB22-1386

Under current law in a dispute over a defendant's competency, a party may request a second evaluation of the defendant. The bill requires that if a second evaluation is completed and restoration is ordered, the court shall make the second evaluation available to the department of human services (department).

The bill permits a defendant to be placed in the department's custody for an inpatient competency evaluation if the court finds the competency report provided by the department does not meet statutory requirements.
For a defendant whose highest charge is a misdemeanor, with some exceptions, the bill requires the court to order outpatient restoration services and grant the defendant a personal recognizance bond unless the defendant meets certification criteria or the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that extraordinary circumstances exist that make release inappropriate and that inpatient restoration services are appropriate.

If the defendant is in custody and the recommendation is that inpatient restoration services are not clinically appropriate to restore the defendant to competency, the bill directs the court to consider releasing the defendant on bond. The bill limits outpatient restoration services to a defendant or juvenile who is a resident of Colorado and requires the services be provided in Colorado.

The bill eliminates the requirement to opine on whether there is a substantial probability that the defendant will be restored to competency and remain competent with the use of medication or not remain competent without the use of forced medication.

After the court has conducted at least 4 competency reviews, the bill requires the court to conduct a competency review every 91 days. The bill requires the court to dismiss the defendant's case if there is not a substantial probability that the defendant will be restored to competency in the reasonably foreseeable future.

Under current law when a court determines that an adult defendant is incompetent to proceed and orders the defendant to undergo restoration treatment, any claim of privilege or confidentiality by the defendant is deemed waived. The bill creates the same waiver for a juvenile defendant who is determined to be incompetent to proceed and is ordered to undergo restoration treatment. A court may order a restoration progress review hearing for a juvenile defendant at any time on the motion of any party or the court. The bill requires that when a court orders a restoration to competency evaluation for a juvenile that the evaluation be completed by the department.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Judiciary

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

HCR 0107

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Public School Finance

HB22-1390

Section 1 of the bill finds that current economic conditions have increased the amount of revenue available to the state for the 2022-23 budget year, allowing the state to increase the amount of appropriation for the state's share of total program funding for school districts and institute charter schools, thereby mitigating the impact of the budget stabilization factor. Additionally, it finds there is uncertainty concerning the continuity and longevity of these current economic conditions and the reliability of continuing high property values and increased revenue. Section 2 of the bill:
- Increases the statewide base per pupil funding for the 2022-23 budget year by $252.88, to account for inflation of 3.5%, to a new statewide base per pupil funding amount of $7,478.16; and
- Sets the total program funding for the 2022-23 budget year for all school districts and institute charter schools after application of the budget stabilization factor to not less than $8,420,114,162.
Section 3 of the bill permits a public school one additional year to discontinue the prohibited use of an American Indian mascot if the public school was first notified of the prohibited use on or after January 1, 2022. Section 4 of the bill extends by one year the requirement for a board of cooperative services (BOCES) to obtain written permission from the school district in which a school operates or is located if the BOCES intends to authorize the school and the school is physically located within the geographic boundaries of a school district that is not a member of the BOCES. Section 5 of the bill extends by one year the ability for local education providers to carry forward more than 15% of per-pupil intervention money received pursuant to the "Colorado READ Act". Sections 6 and 7 of the bill extend by one year the local accountability system grant program and the requirement that the department of education (department) contract with an external evaluator to evaluate the implementation of the local accountability systems. The bill makes an appropriation for this evaluation. Section 8 of the bill extends by one year the completion of the pilot program to develop and use screening and identification processes and intervention strategies for early identification of and support for students enrolled in kindergarten through third grade who may have dyslexia. Section 9 of the bill states that, if a school district permits a student whose parent or guardian is a resident of the state but not a resident of the district to attend school in the district, the school district shall not require the parent, guardian, or student to pay tuition to attend school in the district, regardless of when during the school year, or under what circumstances, the student enrolls in or attends school in the district. Section 10 of the bill authorizes financial assistance through the educator recruitment and retention program to be used for applicants agreeing to teach for 3 years in educator shortage areas in the state. Section 11 of the bill permits a vendor that contracts with the department to develop a quality teacher recruitment program, and commits to satisfying the requirement to match 100% of the money paid by the department for the contract through gifts, grants, or donations from private donors, to also accept gifts, grants and donations from school districts. Section 12 of the bill removes the department's authority to annually reallocate money among participating schools under the local school food purchasing program. Sections 13 to 16 of the bill extend by one year the K-5 social and emotional health pilot program and amend the requirements for school mental health professionals participating in the pilot program. Section 17 of the bill permits 20% of the money appropriated for the Colorado imagination library program to be used by the contractor for operating costs. Section 18 of the bill requires the state auditor to grant an extension of the time to meet auditing requirements for the 2021-22 budget year for rural and small rural school districts that can demonstrate difficulty in retaining an auditor, in lieu of prohibiting the release of tax revenue for the school districts.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Fund Just Transition Community And Worker Supports

HB22-1394

The bill transfers $15 million from the general fund, with $5 million allocated to the just transition cash fund and $10 million allocated to the coal transition workforce assistance program account, and directs the department of labor and employment, through the just transition office, to expend the money for specified coal community and worker supports.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Transportation & Local Government

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

LSB A

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Statewide Equity Office

HB22-1397

The bill creates the statewide equity office (office) in the department of personnel and administration. The office is charged with providing best practices, resources, and guidance for state agencies in offering equitable services to the residents of Colorado as well as providing an accepting and diverse environment for state employees. The bill outlines the duties and responsibilities of the office.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted.)

Upcoming:

House State, Civic, Military, and Veterans Affairs

Status:

Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:33 PM

Resources To Increase Community Safety

SB22-145

The bill establishes 3 new grant programs within the division of criminal justice (division) in the department of public safety:
- A multidisciplinary crime prevention and intervention grant program to award grants to law enforcement, other local governmental agencies, and community-based organizations to identify high-crime areas and to implement crime prevention and intervention strategies in those areas;
- A law enforcement workforce recruitment, retention, and tuition grant program to award grants to law enforcement agencies to address workforce shortages, increase the number of people being trained for law enforcement positions, and improve training through enhanced curriculum, including mental health training; and
- A state's mission for assistance in recruitment and training (SMART) policing grant program to increase the number of P.O.S.T.-certified and non-certified law enforcement officers who are representative of the communities they police and provide training for those additional law enforcement officers.

The bill directs the executive director of the department of public safety to establish policies and procedures and create advisory committees to review applications and make recommendations on who should receive grants and the amount of the grants.

The bill requires the division to host a statewide forum facilitated by a national criminal justice organization to solicit suggestions on crime prevention measures related to the grant programs.

The bill requires the division to create a project management team to coordinate grant programs.

The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate money for the grant programs in the 2022-23 and 2023-24 fiscal years, for the statewide forum in the 2022-23 fiscal year, and for the project management team in the 2022-23 and 2023-24 fiscal years.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate 2nd Reading

4/26/2022

9:00 AM

Senate Chamber

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Senate 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Behavioral Health Administration

HB22-1278

The bill creates the behavioral health administration (BHA) in the department of human services (department) to create a coordinated, cohesive, and effective behavioral health system in the state. The BHA will handle most of the behavioral health programs that were previously handled by the office of behavioral health in the department. The bill establishes a commissioner as the head of the BHA and authorizes the commissioner and state board of human services to adopt and amend rules that previously were promulgated by the executive director of the department.
By July 1, 2024, the bill requires the BHA to establish:
- A statewide behavioral health grievance system;
- A behavioral health performance monitoring system;
- A comprehensive behavioral health safety net system;
- Regionally-based behavioral health administrative service organizations;
- The BHA as the licensing authority for all behavioral health entities; and
- The BHA advisory council to provide feedback to the BHA on the behavioral health system in the state.

The bill transfers to the department of public health and environment responsibility for community prevention and early intervention programs previously administered by the department.

The bill makes extensive conforming amendments.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Health & Human Services

4/27/2022

1:30 PM

SCR 357

Status:

Introduced in House,Passed House,Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Reproductive Health Equity Act

HB22-1279

The bill declares that every individual has a fundamental right to use or refuse contraception; every pregnant individual has a fundamental right to continue the pregnancy and give birth or to have an abortion; and a fertilized egg, embryo, or fetus does not have independent or derivative rights under the laws of the state.

The bill prohibits state and local public entities from:
- Denying, restricting, interfering with, or discriminating against an individual's fundamental right to use or refuse contraception or to continue a pregnancy and give birth or to have an abortion in the regulation or provision of benefits, services, information, or facilities; and
- Depriving, through prosecution, punishment, or other means, an individual of the individual's right to act or refrain from acting during the individual's own pregnancy based on the potential, actual, or perceived impact on the pregnancy, the pregnancy's outcomes, or on the pregnant individual's health.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Signed into Law

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading,Passed House,Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Pikes Peak Community College Name Change

HB22-1280

The bill changes the name of Pikes Peak community college to Pikes Peak state college.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Passed- Pending Governor Signature

Status:

Introduced in House,Passed House,Passed Senate,Sent to the Governor

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Behavioral Health-care Services For Children

SB22-147

The bill creates in the university of Colorado the Colorado pediatric psychiatry consultation and access program (CoPPCAP). The purpose of CoPPCAP is to support primary care providers in identifying and treating mild to moderate behavioral health conditions in children in primary care practices or school-based health centers. The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate from the behavioral and mental health cash fund:
- $4.6 million to CoPPCAP;
- $5 million to the behavioral health care professional matching grant program to expand access to behavioral health-care services for children and families; and
- $1.5 million to the school-based health center grant program.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted.)

Upcoming:

House Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services

4/26/2022

1:30 PM

HCR 0112

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Colorado Land-based Tribe Behavioral Health Services Grant Program

SB22-148

The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate $5 million from the behavioral and mental health cash fund to the department of health and human services for the purpose of making a grant to one or more Colorado land-based tribes to support capital expenditure for the renovation or building of a behavioral health facility to provide behavioral and mental health services.
The grant program repeals on July 1, 2027.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Improve Marijuana Industry Regulation

SB22-149

The bill requires future contracts for the seed-to-sale tracking system to be awarded pursuant to a transparent, online, and dynamically competitive process. The bill requires the state licensing authority to produce an annual report regarding its enforcement activities. The report must include:
- The number of underage compliance checks performed in the previous calendar year;
- The number of underage sale violations in the previous calendar year, including the name of the license violator, how many violations were the result of underage compliance checks or tips, and the sanction or sanctions imposed for each violation; and
- A description of the black or gray market enforcement activities that the state licensing authority engaged in, including the dates of the activities, any violations found, and the result of those violations if known.

The bill requires the state licensing authority to produce an annual report regarding licensing violations. The report must be organized by month, include the name of the violator and the violation location, and identify the violation and the sanction or sanctions imposed and if the sanction is a license revocation or voluntary surrender of a license and the reason for the revocation or voluntary surrender.

The state licensing authority shall maintain a free searchable database on its website related to compliance check records and minor in possession of marijuana records and an online method for submitting an anonymous tip related to licensing violations.

The bill requires the state licensing authority to conduct at least 2 compliance checks a year at each medical and retail marijuana center.

The bill requires regulatory penalties related to underage sales to be based on the number of violations and any injury or death that occurred as a result of the violation.

The bill requires the state licensing authority to promulgate rules regarding:
- Product recalls, including a requirement for the issuance of a health and safety advisory when a product is recalled that includes the name of the product, the timing of when the consumer would receive the advisory, the places where the product was sold, the time period when the product was for sale, the requested actions that the state licensing authority may direct to a seller, cultivator, or manufacturer, and any other additional information that would assist the public; and
- Timelines and deadlines for notifying a licensee of an alleged violation; a licensee's response to an alleged violation; and a licensee's compliance with any sanction imposed, which must require, in the case of an uncontested violation, that the licensee has 90 days to comply with the sanction.

The bill directs that when the state licensing authority convenes a work group, task force, or other group to assist in developing rules or policies that involve public health and consumer safety, the state licensing authority shall make every reasonable attempt to have broad representation from non-marijuana industry parties on the work group, task force, or other group. The bill requires the state licensing authority to provide any written materials received from a member of the group or task force to all members of the group or task force within 7 days after receipt of the material; except that any proprietary information must be redacted from the material.

The bill requires that when the state licensing authority reports a voluntary surrender of a license that is the result of a settlement or agreement with the licensing authority, the report shall designate the action as "voluntary surrender - licensing violation settlement".

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Postpone Indefinitely

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Postponed Indefinitely

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Missing And Murdered Indigenous Relatives

SB22-150

The bill establishes the office of liaison for missing and murdered indigenous relatives (office) in the department of public safety (department). The bill lists the office's duties, which include assisting with missing indigenous persons investigations and homicide cases involving indigenous victims; taking measures to address issues relating to missing or murdered indigenous persons; and providing assistance to families of victims. Office personnel have access to criminal justice records and medical, coroner, and laboratory records in the custody of a state or local agency that are relevant and necessary for the office to perform its duties.
A community volunteer advisory board (board) is established in the office to identify and advise the office on areas of concern regarding missing or murdered indigenous relatives and issues of collaborative efforts related to missing or murdered indigenous relatives. The executive director appoints members to the board. Members are not office personnel.

In carrying out its duties, the office is required to collaborate with the Colorado commission of Indian affairs; federally recognized tribes; state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies; and indigenous-led organizations. The office must publish on its public website an overview of missing and murdered indigenous persons injustice.

The bill requires the Colorado bureau of investigation (bureau) to work with the office and federal, state, tribal, and local law enforcement agencies for the efficient investigation of missing or murdered indigenous persons. The bureau must operate a clearinghouse database on missing indigenous persons from Colorado and prepare an annual report on information about missing or murdered indigenous persons. The bureau is required to operate a missing indigenous person alert program.

The bill requires peace officers to receive training concerning issues relating to missing or murdered indigenous persons. The peace officer standards and training board must work with the office to develop and facilitate the training.

The bill requires a law enforcement agency that receives a report of a missing indigenous person to notify the bureau.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House State, Civic, Military, and Veterans Affairs

4/25/2022

1:30 PM

LSB A

Status:

Passed Senate,Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Safe Crossings For Colorado Wildlife And Motorists

SB22-151

The bill creates the Colorado wildlife safe passages cash fund (fund) within the state treasury for use by the department of transportation (department) to provide funding for projects by the department that provide safe road crossings for connectivity of wildlife and that reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. The department must consult with the division of parks and wildlife and the Colorado wildlife and transportation alliance regarding the disbursement of money from the fund and must annually report on the disbursement of such money.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Pending Senate Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Residence Of Voter Whose Home Is Destroyed

SB22-152

The bill allows a person whose residence has been destroyed or rendered uninhabitable by a natural disaster or by other means to maintain residency for purposes of voting at the address of the destroyed residence if the person intends to return to the residence once it is replaced or becomes habitable. In such a case, the person's residence given for motor vehicle registration and for state income tax purposes is not required to be the same as the person's residence for voting purposes.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Signed into Law

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Introduced in House,Sent to the Governor,Signed into Law

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Internal Election Security Measures

SB22-153

The bill increases election security measures for the secretary of state's office, election officials, candidates for elected office, and voters.

Current law authorizes the attorney general and the secretary of state (secretary) to enforce the provisions of the election code by injunctive action brought in the district court for the judicial district in which any violation occurs. Section 4 of the bill requires the district court and the supreme court, if applicable, to expedite scheduling and the issuance of any orders in connection with an enforcement action so a final ruling is made within specified periods.

Section 5 authorizes a coordinated election official or the secretary's office to file a petition in district court alleging that a person charged with a duty under the election code has committed or is about to commit a breach or neglect of duty or other wrongful act.

Current law specifies that certain employees in the clerk and recorder's office are required to complete a certification program for election officials provided by the secretary (certification program). Section 6 includes a designated election official for a county, a coordinated election official for a county, and employees in the election division of the department of state (department), at the discretion of the secretary, as people required to complete the certification program. Section 6 also specifies new requirements for the length of time that an employee, designated election official, or coordinated election official has to complete the certification program.

The curriculum for the certification program is required to include specified courses. Section 7 requires that courses in voter registration and list maintenance, accessibility, coordinated elections, mail ballot and in-person voting processes, voting systems testing, risk-limiting audits, canvass, and election security be included in the certification program curriculum. Section 8 specifies the circumstances under which a person is ineligible to serve as a designated election official for a county or a coordinated election official.

Section 8 also specifies that, while serving as a designated election official or a coordinated election official, a person is prohibited from knowingly or recklessly making, publishing, broadcasting, or circulating any false statement for the purposes of promoting misinformation or disinformation related to the administration of elections.

Certain elected officials or candidates for elective office are currently prohibited from preparing, maintaining, or repairing any voting equipment or device that is to be used in an election. Section 9 modifies the prohibition to apply to any contact with the voting equipment or device, rather than just physical contact. Section 9 also prohibits any elected official or candidate for elective office in a political subdivision with a population of 100,000 or more from having access to or being present in a room with voting equipment or devices without being accompanied by one or more persons with authorized access.

The governing body of any political subdivision is currently authorized to adopt an electronic or electromechanical voting system. Section 10 requires that for elections conducted under the "Uniform Election Code of 1992", the governing body of any political subdivision is required to adopt an electronic or electromechanical voting system to be used for tabulating votes at all elections held by the political subdivision. This requirement does not apply to counties with fewer than 1,000 active electors at the date of the last general election.

Section 11 prohibits a county from creating, permitting any person to create, or disclosing to any person an image of the hard drive of any voting system component without the express written permission of the department.

By a specified date, section 12 requires a designated election official to keep all components of a voting system in a location where entry is controlled by use of a key card access system and that is under video security surveillance recording. The designated election official is required to ensure that records in connection with access to the location of the voting system and video recordings of the location are created and maintained for specified periods. Section 3 defines terms in connection with these requirements.

Section 12 also directs the general assembly to make an appropriation from the general fund to the department of state for the 2022-23 state fiscal year to be used to administer a grant program to provide assistance to counties in complying with the security requirements of the bill.

Section 13 states that if a majority of a canvass board in a county is unable to or does not certify the abstract of votes for any reason by the applicable deadline, the secretary is required to review the noncertified abstract of votes and other evidence provided by the canvass board. If, after review, the secretary determines that the noncertified abstract of votes is sufficiently explicit in showing how many votes were cast for each candidate, ballot question, or ballot issue, the secretary is required to certify the results for the county and proceed to certifying state results.

Current law requires a person to comply with certain rules of the secretary when carrying out the duties of the secretary. Section 14 specifies that a person is also required to comply with other policies of the secretary, including the acceptable use policy for the statewide voter registration system, when carrying out such duties. Section 14 also specifies that any person who willfully interferes with a person in notifying or obstructs a person from notifying the department of a potential violation or retaliates against a person for providing such notice is subject to current penalties for election offenses.

Current law prohibits a person from tampering with electronic voting equipment with the intent to change the tabulation of votes in an election. In addition, section 15 prohibits a person from accessing electronic voting equipment or an election-night reporting system without authorization and specifies that a person who accesses such equipment or system is guilty of a class 5 felony. Section 15 also specifies that an authorized person who knowingly publishes or causes to be published passwords or other confidential information relating to a voting system will immediately have their authorized access revoked and is guilty of a class 5 felony.

Upcoming:

House Appropriations

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Introduced in House,Pending House Appropriations

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Behavioral Health-care Continuum Gap Grant Program

HB22-1281

The bill establishes the community behavioral health-care continuum gap grant program (grant program) in the behavioral health administration (BHA). The BHA administers the grant program. As part of the grant program, the BHA may award community investment grants to support services along the continuum of behavioral health care and children, youth, and family services grants to expand youth-oriented and family-oriented behavioral health-care services. A community-based organization, local government, or nonprofit organization is eligible for a grant award.
The BHA must develop a behavioral health-care services assessment tool that grant applicants can use to identify regional gaps in services on the behavioral health-care service continuum. In awarding grants, the BHA shall give preference to applicants providing a service that addresses a gap in services identified with the assessment tool.

In order to receive a grant, an applicant must submit an application and identify a source of contributing funds or nonfinancial contributing resources, such as in-kind contributions, that directly support the behavioral health-care services provided with the grant award.

Each grant recipient must report to the BHA information about the use of the grant award. The state department of human services must include information about the grant program in its annual "State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act" hearing.

The bill appropriates $90 million from the behavioral and mental health cash fund to the state department for the grant program.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00a

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

The Innovative Housing Incentive Program

HB22-1282

The bill creates the innovative housing incentive program (program) within the office of economic development (office). A business located in Colorado that manufactures certain types of housing may apply for funding through the program. Funding may be awarded through grants for capital operating expenses and for incentives for units manufactured based on criteria established by the office, such as affordability, location where the unit is installed in the state, or meeting energy efficiency standards. Or, funding may be awarded through loans for the purpose of funding a manufacturing factory. The bill creates the innovative housing incentive program fund, requires a $40 million transfer to the fund, and continuously appropriates all money in the fund to the office to fund the program.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Business, Labor, & Technology

4/25/2022

1:30 PM

SCR 352

Status:

Introduced in House,Passed House,Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Health Insurance Surprise Billing Protections

HB22-1284

The bill changes current state law to align with the federal "No Surprises Act" (act) by:
- Allowing a covered person who requests an independent external review of a health-care coverage decision to request a review to determine if the services that were provided or may be provided by an out-of-network provider or facility are subject to an in-network benefit level of coverage;
- Requiring that payments made for health-care services provided at an in-network facility or by an out-of-network provider be applied to the covered person's in-network deductible and any out-of-pocket maximum amounts as if the services were provided by an in-network provider;
- Requiring that emergency health-care services, regardless of the facility at which they are provided, be covered at the in-network benefit level;
- Requiring each health insurance carrier (carrier) to cover post-stabilization services to stabilize a patient after a medical emergency at the in-network benefit level unless specific criteria are met;
- Requiring carriers to develop disclosures to provide to covered persons that comply with the act;
- Requiring the commissioner of insurance (commissioner) and certain regulators of health-care occupations to adopt rules concerning disclosure requirements, including a list of ancillary services for which a provider or facility cannot charge a balance bill;
- Requiring the commissioner to convene a work group to facilitate and streamline the implementation of the payment of claims for services provided by an out-of-network provider at an in-network facility and for services surrounding a medical emergency;
- Prohibiting a carrier from recalculating a covered person's cost-sharing amount based on an additional payment made as a result of arbitration;
- Requiring the parties to an arbitration over health-care coverage to split the costs of the arbitrator if the parties reach an agreement before the final decision of the arbitrator;
- Allowing administrators of self-funded health benefit plans to elect to be subject to state law concerning coverage for health-care services from out-of-network providers and facilities;
- Authorizing the commissioner to promulgate rules to implement the requirements of the act;
- Changing the amount of time that a managed care plan must allow a person to continue to receive care from a provider from 60 to 90 days after the date an in-network provider is terminated from a plan without cause;
- Implementing specific requirements for health-care coverage and services for covered persons who are continuing care patients of a provider or facility whose contract with the patient's health insurer is terminated; and
- Allowing an out-of-network provider and an out-of-network facility to charge a covered person a balance bill for health-care services other than ancillary services if the out-of-network provider complies with specific notice requirements and obtains the covered person's signed consent.

The bill changes from January 1 to March 1 the date by which a carrier is required to submit information to the commissioner concerning the use of out-of-network providers and out-of-network facilities and the impact on health insurance premiums for consumers.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Prohibit Collection Hospital Not Disclosing Prices

HB22-1285

The bill prohibits a hospital or other person or entity collecting on behalf of the hospital from initiating or pursuing collection actions against a patient or patient guarantor for debt incurred by the patient on the date or dates of service when the hospital was not in compliance with federal hospital price transparency laws.
Nothing in the bill:
- Prohibits a hospital from billing a patient or health insurer for items or services provided to the patient; or
- Requires a hospital to refund a payment made to the hospital for items or services provided to a patient.

A hospital that initiates or pursues a prohibited collection action is subject to a penalty equal to the amount of the debt and must refund any amount paid on the debt and pay attorney fees and costs.

The bill makes attempting to collect the debt an unfair practice under the "Colorado Fair Debt Collections Act".

The bill authorizes the department of public health and environment, in considering a hospital's license renewal application, to consider whether the hospital is or has been in compliance with federal hospital price transparency laws.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Protections For Mobile Home Park Residents

HB22-1287

The bill amends the "Mobile Home Park Act" and the "Mobile Home Park Act Dispute Resolution and Enforcement Program" to:
- Prohibit a landlord from increasing rent on a mobile home lot by an amount that exceeds the greater of inflation or 3 percentage points in any 12-month period;
- Require the landlord or the landlord's representative to attend up to 2 public meetings for residents of the park each year at the request of the residents;
- Clarify that a landlord is responsible for the cost of repairing any damage to a mobile home or lot that results from the landlord's failure to maintain the premises of the park;
- Clarify the triggering events that demonstrate a park owner's intent to sell a park for purposes of providing notice to home owners and the method for giving notice;
- Change the period in which a group or association of mobile home owners may make an offer to purchase the park from 90 to 180 days, and provide for tolling of that time period in certain circumstances;
- Provide a right of first refusal for a public entity that accepts an assignment of a group or association of mobile home owners' opportunity to purchase;
- Clarify the obligations of a landlord to provide notice to home owners concerning the terms and conditions of an offer to purchase the park that the landlord would accept and to negotiate in good faith with the home owners;
- Require a landlord who changes the use of the land comprising the park to compensate a mobile home owner who has not given notice to terminate the lease or rental agreement and who is displaced by the change in use for the reasonable costs of relocating the mobile home to a location within 100 miles of the park, the fair market value of the mobile home before the change in use, or in the amount of $7,500 for a single-section mobile home or $10,000 for a multi-section mobile home;
- Allow the department to enforce statutory provisions concerning the required notice of intent to sell or change the use of the land and the mobile home owners' opportunity to purchase by imposing a fine for a violation or filing for injunctive relief in district court;
- Allow the attorney general to investigate and enforce statutory provisions providing protections for mobile home owners;
- Allow a resident, local government, or a nonprofit to file a complaint with the division under the dispute resolution program;
- Clarify the procedures and penalties that apply when a party does not respond to a subpoena from the division;
- Allow the division to take immediate action in response to complaints or violations that will cause immediate harm to mobile home owners;
- Prohibit landlords from harassing or coercing mobile home owners in an effort to require a mobile owner to sign an agreement or to influence a decision by the home owner about an opportunity to purchase;
- Establish criteria for when a mobile home park rule or regulation that limits a home owner's right to control the use, appearance, and structure of a mobile home is enforceable;
- Prohibit a landlord from interfering with the mobile home owner's right to sell a mobile home to the buyer of his or her choice, except in limited circumstances;
- Establish record retention requirements for landlords; and
- Consolidate provisions concerning private rights of action for landlords, home owners, and residents, and establish penalties and remedies available in private actions.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 2nd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Safe Reporting Assaults Suffered By Sex Workers

HB22-1288

The bill grants immunity to the charge of prostitution, soliciting for prostitution, or prostitute making display (prostitution offense) to a person who seeks assistance from a law enforcement officer, the 911 system, or a medical provider for a victim or as a victim of a violent crime or offense (crime) if the evidence for the charge of a prostitution offense was obtained as a result of the person seeking assistance or as a result of the need for assistance. A person who receives immunity for a prostitution offense is not immune from prosecution for other offenses, and a district attorney or law enforcement officer may obtain or use evidence obtained from a report, recording, or other statement provided as a result of the initial prostitution offense to prosecute any other offense.
For the purposes of the bill, "person" is defined as the victim of the crime, a person who is a victim of human trafficking for sexual servitude, or a witness to the crime. The bill sets forth the applicable violent crimes or offenses.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Passed- Pending Governor Signature

Status:

Passed House,Passed Senate,Sent to the Governor

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Health Benefits For Colorado Children And Pregnant Persons

HB22-1289

The bill makes the following changes to health insurance coverage for low-income pregnant people and children in low-income families:
- Provides full health insurance coverage for Colorado pregnant people who would be eligible for medicaid and the children's basic health plan (CHIP) if not for their immigration status and continues that coverage for 12 months postpartum at the CHIP federal matching rate;
- Provides comprehensive health insurance coverage to all Colorado children who would be eligible for medicaid and CHIP if not for their immigration status;
- Requires the state department of health care policy and financing to create an outreach and enrollment strategy for enrolling eligible groups into new coverage options;
- Makes comprehensive lactation supports and supplies, including breast pumps, a covered benefit for perinatal people on medicaid and CHIP;
- Draws down federal funds to improve perinatal and postpartum support and requires that priorities for the funds be determined through a stakeholder process;
- Permanently authorizes an existing survey of birthing parents, run by the state department of public health and environment and increases the ability of the survey to collect and report on the experiences of birthing people of color in Colorado;
- Creates a special enrollment period for health insurance coverage due to pregnancy so that an eligible person can sign up for insurance as soon as the person becomes pregnant; and
- Improves the quality of health insurance coverage available through the health insurance affordability enterprise.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Health & Human Services

Status:

Introduced in House,Passed House,Pending Scheduling in Committee

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Special Education Services In Charter Schools

HB22-1294

The bill allows a district charter school or an institute charter school, upon approval of the authorizing school district board of education or the state charter school institute (CSI), respectively, to develop and administer an enrollment preference plan to give enrollment preference to children with disabilities. In exercising the enrollment preference plan for children with disabilities, a charter school and an institute charter school shall ensure compliance with the obligation to provide a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment pursuant to the federal "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act". A charter school or an institute charter school may allow parents to voluntarily provide information regarding the existence of a child's disability.
The bill allows the state board of education (state board) to designate a charter school network or charter school collaborative that meets specified criteria as an administrative unit for the purpose of providing special education services to children with disabilities. If the state board designates a charter school network or charter school collaborative as an administrative unit, a charter school that is within the charter school network or is participating in the charter school collaborative is required to amend its charter contract to reflect that the charter school is participating in the administrative unit of the charter school network or charter school collaborative.

If the parents of a child with a disability remove the child in the middle of the school year from enrollment in the alternative administrative unit in which a district or institute charter school participates, that alternative administrative unit continues to be deemed the child's administrative unit of residence for the remainder of the school year and may be required to pay the tuition charge for excess costs to the administrative unit of attendance that enrolls the child for the remainder of the school year. The bill further clarifies provisions concerning the payment of tuition for excess costs when a child with a disability is enrolled in a district or institute charter school that participates in an alternative administrative unit that is a charter school network or charter school collaborative.

The bill allows a district charter school or an institute charter school, upon approval of the administrative unit of a charter school network or charter school collaborative, to enter into an agreement to participate in that administrative unit. The district charter school or institute charter school is required to amend its district charter contract or institute charter contract, respectively, to reflect that the district charter school or institute charter school is participating in the administrative unit of the charter school network or charter school collaborative.

The bill allows a district charter school, upon approval of the CSI, to enter into an agreement with the CSI to participate in the CSI's administrative unit. The district charter school is required to amend its charter contract to reflect that it is participating in the CSI's administrative unit.

The bill specifies that a charter school collaborative may provide special education and related services to participating schools as authorized by the contract creating the charter school collaborative. Participating charter schools of the charter school collaborative shall share costs and financial support for special education and related services.

The bill clarifies that a charter school is not required to pay its authorizing school district for federally required educational services that are not available to the charter school.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Reconciliation

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee,Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Department Early Childhood And Universal Preschool Program

HB22-1295

Concerning the department of early childhood, and, in connection therewith, establishing the duties of the department of early childhood and the executive director of the department, relocating early childhood programs from the departments of human services and education to the department of early childhood, and creating the Colorado universal preschool program.

Upcoming:

Passed- Pending Governor Signature

Status:

Introduced in House,Pending Scheduling in Committee,Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Sent to the Governor

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Daylight Saving Time Year Round

HB22-1297

Currently, "United States Mountain Standard Time" (MST), defined in federal law as coordinated universal time minus 7 hours, is the standard time within Colorado. During the period of daylight saving time (i.e., the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November) time is advanced one hour. Federal law allows a state to stay on standard time year round, but does not currently allow a state to adopt daylight saving time year round.

The bill makes daylight saving time, defined as coordinated universal time minus 6 hours, the year-round standard time within the state, but takes effect only if a federal law is enacted to allow states to remain on daylight saving time year round.

Upcoming:

Passed- Pending Governor Signature

Status:

Introduced in House,Passed House,Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Increasing Safety In Assisted Living Residences

SB22-154

Section 1 of the bill, with regard to the involuntary discharge of residents from an assisted living residence (residence):
- Requires a residence to provide written notice to the resident and other specified persons at least 30 days prior to the involuntary discharge;
- Requires the residence to include certain information and documentation with the written notice; and
- Establishes a process for a resident or other specified persons to challenge an involuntary discharge, including the ability to file a grievance with the residence, a requirement that the residence respond to the grievance, the ability to appeal to the department of public health and environment (department), and the ability to request an administrative hearing.
Section 2 requires the state board of health (state board) to promulgate rules that:
- Require all residence administrators, on and after January 1, 2024, to meet or exceed the minimum educational, training, and experience standards established by the state board, and section 3 establishes a fine for the residence if the residence's administrator fails to meet the standards;
- Require the residence owner or residence to conduct a check of the Colorado adult protective services data system for any person responsible for the care and welfare of residents;
- Require the residence to comply with provisions concerning involuntary discharge of residents; and
- Establish a range of fines for violations, including violations that result in harm or injury to residents.
Section 3 removes the $2,000 annual cap on the amount of fines that may be imposed by the department as an intermediate restriction or condition on a residence license and requires the department to impose a fine for any violation resulting in actual harm or injury to a resident. The bill allows the department to determine the amount of the fine, consistent with state board rules, based on factors listed in the bill including, in part:
- The size of the residence and the number of residents impacted by the violation;
- The actual or potential harm to one or more residents;
- Prior violations or a pattern of violations; and
- The level of fine that will deter future violations.
Section 3 also:
- Requires the department to suspend, revoke, or refuse to renew a residence license if a resident is subject to mistreatment that causes injury to the resident; the residence's owner or administrator either directly caused the mistreatment or the mistreatment resulted from the administrator's failure to adequately train or supervise employees; and a directed written plan to correct the violation, in addition to the assessment of civil fines, has not or is not reasonably expected to correct the violations; and
- Permits the department to refuse to renew a license if the residence administrator does not meet or exceed the minimum educational, training, and experience standards established by the state board.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House Health & Insurance

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Introduced in House

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Expand Medical Marijuana Research Grant Programs

SB22-155

The bill expands the medical marijuana research grant program by:
- Providing grant funding for research intended to ascertain the safety of medical marijuana products; and
- Encouraging the state board of health to prioritize grants to research the safety of medical marijuana products and the safety of administering medical marijuana for posttraumatic stress disorder.

The bill requires the state treasurer to transfer $3 million from the general fund to the health research subaccount in the medical marijuana cash fund for the purpose of providing research grants and administering the grant program.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate Appropriations

4/26/2022

8:15 AM

LSB B

Status:

Introduced in Senate

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Medicaid Prior Authorization And Recovery Of Payment

SB22-156

The bill prohibits a prepaid inpatient health plan from:
- Requiring prior authorization for outpatient psychotherapy services;
- Recovering provider payments if a recipient was initially determined to be eligible for medical benefits; and
- Retroactively recovering provider payments after 12 months from the date a claim was paid, except in certain circumstances.

If a prepaid inpatient health plan retroactively recovers a provider payment that is equal to or greater than $1,000, the bill requires the prepaid inpatient health plan to work with the provider to develop a payment plan if the provider requests a payment plan.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

House 3rd Reading

4/25/2022

10:00 AM

House Chamber

Status:

Introduced in Senate,Passed Senate,Introduced in House,House 2nd Reading

Last Updated

April 24, 2022, 7:43:32 PM

Revolving Loan Fund Invest Affordable Housing

SB22-159

The bill creates the transformational affordable housing revolving loan fund program (loan program) in the division of housing (division) in the department of local affairs (department) as a revolving loan program in accordance with the requirements of the bill and the policies established by the division. The loan program provides flexible, low-interest, and below-market rate loan funding to assist eligible recipients in completing the eligible loan projects identified in the bill.
The division may administer the loan program or, if it determines that it would be more efficient and effective to contract out full or partial administration of the program, the division may enter into a contract with a third-party entity to administer the loan program.

The division is required to establish and publicize policies for the loan program. The bill specifies factors the division is encouraged to consider in evaluating loan applications.

The transformational affordable housing revolving loan fund (fund) is created in the state treasury and the bill specifies requirements pertaining to the administration of the fund.

The bill requires a transfer of a specified sum of money to the fund.

The division is required to report on the activities of the loan program as part of the regular annual public report prepared by the division on affordable housing spending undertaken by the state.

(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Upcoming:

Senate 2nd Reading